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with viewers how have you used this technology? >> sure. the iran the targeting program in u.s. africa command from 2007 to 2010. you're right we don't call them drones. we call them remotely piloted aircraft. the key there it takes 200 people to keep one of these airborne for a 24-hour orbit. it has incredible level oversight scrutiny, intelligence, lawyers, commanders watching us use the tools. there are very legitimate questions as to whether we should use lethal force in the counterterrorism strategy overseas and how is that legal and whether it is the right strategy. once you decide to use lethal force and picking a platform, the rpas give you a tremendous amount of scrutiny, oversight, persistence, per significance and flexibility to abort at the last minute if the target moves or civilians come into the area. jenna: that is why i want to mention use of language is very important. when you say drone, oh, these are things flying around the skies. >> right. jenna: one person having a cup of coffee behind directs these type of things. as you point out that is not exactly the case. let's tal
behind. and these are new technologies. they are great innovations that are coming down the pike. we need to address those. we need to move forward. i came here to talk about reasonable fiscal solutions. we just heard a debate, a good debate about the effects of sequestration. we know we have challenges. on both sides of the aisle there is a sense of purpose to change the trajectory of this debt. we are spending -- we are borrowing 40 cents of every dollar we spend. we have a national debt that is almost equal to our gross domestic product. we have interest payments that are the third-highest payment that we make here, and that's at a time of record-low interest rates. this is unsustainable, and it needs to be addressed but i think it needs to be addressed responsibly. and so, like many of you, i have my own personal passions, and they involve senior citizens, making sure that we provide them with a secure future. but also a secure future for future senio senior citizens. veterans care deeply about the condition of veterans benefits and what we're going to do to reward and thank -- truly
-span2. >> technology reporter joins us from capitol hill. what's the purpose of the senate interpret sales tax bill? >> well, this legislation would allow states to require that online retailers charge sales tax collect, and remit them when consumers make a purchase op line. that includes retailers not within their own state. >> what are some of the bill supporters, and why did some say it levels the player field for retailers? >> well, the bill supports, incoming the big retailers, walmart, best buy, amazon.com, online retailers also, say brick and mortar retailers are at a disadvantage charging sales tax and online doesn't. consumers are supposed to pay the taxes on their tax return, but studies show that most don't so in effect online goods get that 6% to 10% on average discount on goods. >> what about the opponents of the bill, who do we hear from and what are the arguments against the bill? >> the strongest opposition is from those states where they don't charge a sales tax because they contend retailers would have to have a burden to call late tax to various localities and stat
technology thesis expanding those. i tried to pacify unanimous consent and schumer came up and said no but how about passing mine by unanimous consent and i was actually quiet. they would have been shocked by that but they would have gotten something done. it would have been great fun to see we passed immigration reform by unanimous consent. >> i have to ask you about grover cleveland. >> if i was allowed to go back to when i wasn't alive, he seemed to be opposed to special interests and the also seem to be -- veto a bunch of bills and i think he it was a time period and i think some would call him a populist. part of me feels that way. >> we can probably get into more. alex and doyle. >> you're raising money for the national association of gun rights and he reported last week this came up for conversation and the steering committee. susan collins was pretty upset about that because the national session is gun rights is running ads and she is afraid it could cost party your seat. are you going to not do that in the future or change your course of action and will you be jeopardizing
the success in reducing alcohol-impaired driving through technology, through sanctions, through education, through engineering, we can do the same thing about drugged driving. but the most important thing that we had to do first was to bring it to the attention of the public, and i think that's what we've done. thank you, bob. >> we are almost out of time. of but before asking the last question, we have a couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all, i'd like to remind you about our upcoming luncheon events. on april 19th, patrick donahoe, postmaster general, usps, will discuss challenges meeting the evolving demands of the nation's postal system. on may 7th, chris evert, tennis legend and publisher, "tennis" magazine. and on june 3rd we will host the annual presentation of the gerald r. ford journalism awards. second, i would, with great feeling -- [laughter] in view of how you've covered your topic and you have generated so many questions, wow. i mean, i ity -- i don't know if we keep track of a record -- i'd like to present you with the traditional npc mug. [applause] t
records are prime targets for attackers to steal. according to the information technology industry council, 18 adults become victims to cybercrime, including identity campaigns ishing every second. this adds up to 1 1/2 million cybercrime victims each day. cyberattacks present a very real and dangerous threat to the united states, however the government currently
the door for this, but this is why i answer the way i did that i see that with the technology goings way it is and with drone technology advancing and drones getting smaller and smaller, they are not going to the the giant, big predators flying over pakistan, but little small drones to be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of this is actually happening. >> booktv on location on the campus of the university of southern california at the l.a. times festival of books talking with mark mazzetti, "new york times" national security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife," and, jim, you're the next caller from idaho. hi, jim. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i have a question. the la proider of servicee of to the war department in afghanistan, and i asked how the afghans were going, and i quoted him in the remark right now saying that it's basically a total failure. he went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> well, it's obviously a question on a lot of people's mind.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7